Experiments are described in which the distribution of antibodies in tissues following general active and passive immunization was determined. The ratio of tissue-antibodies to serum-antibodies was found to be, on an average, one to ten.

The distribution of antibodies in tissues following immunization by intranasal vaccination was determined and it was found that the ratio of tissue-antibodies to serum-antibodies in tissues regionally vaccinated was on an average one to five. Instances were seen in which the ratio of tissue antibody to serum antibody in such tissues was as high as one to one and two to one.

Animals were vaccinated simultaneously with two antigens, one given regionally, the other generally. In such animals the ratio of tissue-antibody to serum-antibody in regionally vaccinated tissues was consistently higher for the regional antigen than for the general antigen.

The possible explanations for the findings are discussed.

It is suggested that the probable explanation for the findings is the local formation of antibody in the tissues regionally stimulated by antigen.

The importance of regional vaccination in closing a portal of infection is stressed.

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